i’m not good at being a person

I just walked by this lady who works in the office next to mine and instead of the usual, “Hi” or “Hi, how are you?” You know what I said?

“Hello!”

Let me ask you something – who says that word anymore? No one. People say “hi.” Not the entire damn word. Maybe people in London do. I’m not sure about that, but they might. I don’t even know why I would think that, but I do.

So not only do I say “hello,” I said it in this weird tone where I kind of lifted my voice up at the end of the word so it sounded like, “Helooo!”

It was a really awkward moment. I’m sure right after she passed me she was thinking, “what the hell was that all about?”

Perfect.

Now I’m that weird dude who sounds like he’s from London.

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6 Comments

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6 responses to “i’m not good at being a person

  1. A hahaha!

    (PS:found you through 20sb)

    It’s true… very few people say “hello” anymore. Unless they’re being professional, of course. Or they are British. The lunch chef I sometimes work with is from Bristol and he always says “hello”, or ” ‘ello” as I hear it.

  2. ok, so i was right! I think next time i see her I’ll say something about big ben… you know, something really witty like that.

  3. callmekp

    I also found you via 20SB. And I love this post.

    You know who killed “hello?” Alicia Silverstone. Yes. Cher from ‘Clueless’. At the cinematic center of the Valley Girl phenomenon, blondie single-handedly took down an entire word.

    In theory, it should be a formal greeting. The Brits have it right. But homegirl made it irritating. A declaration of the obvious. A mainland version of “Aloha” with it’s varying meanings.

    Terrible.

    Oh, great blog by the way. Loved your Grammy review.

  4. callmekp – Ya know, I think you deserve some kind of reward for investigative thinking, you are on point!

  5. Pingback: and many more « surviving myself

  6. FX

    It’s true. I felt that I sounded so out of place saying Hello in America that I asked my friend if it was ever used in their language…

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